Rubs




 

Rubs

A rub is a mixture of herbs, spices, and seasonings liberally applied to coat the outside of meat, poultry, or fish. Salt is always a great starting place for a rub. It helps the rub penetrate, and it rounds out and brings together the flavors of the ingredients. Sugar is also a popular addition to rubs as it caramelizes when exposed to high heat.
If adding a sugar, do so sparingly as they burn easily. If using seeds, nuts, dried herbs, or spices, be sure to crush them first to release their entire flavor. The only real rule is that there is no right or wrong mixture. It's all a matter of personal preference!

Rubs

Like marinades, rubs add flavor to food before cooking, however rubs provide stronger flavors than marinades, which consists of oils with an acidic liquid, such as vinegar and citrus juice.

Types of Rubs

Dry Rubs
These are mixtures containing any number of dried herbs and spices. Dry rubs adhere using the natural moisture of the meat, poultry, or fish. » more about Dry Rubs!
Wet Rubs
A wet rub has a moist ingredient added to the spices and herbs. Common ingredients added to make a wet rub may include, but are not limited to: mustard, finely chopped garlic, oil, horseradish, and yogurt. Wet rubs are also called pastes, denoting their consistency. They adhere to food more easily than dry rubs. » more about Wet Rubs!
Marinades
The purpose of a marinade is to add flavor and in some cases, tenderize meat. The word marinade dates back to the 1600's when meat was cured in brine to preserve them. Marinating is a great way to experiment with new flavors. » more about Marinades!